Making a proportional grid

People always like to predict their behavior, even in circumstances they’ve never experienced. In product feedback this means you get a lot of hypothetical behavior — people tell you they’ll upgrade if you add that one more thing, or they’d adopt it when their team size is big enough. There’s a massive temptation to treat this on equal footing with people who have actually upgraded or adopted your product.

What’s a conversation

People always like to predict their behavior, even in circumstances they’ve never experienced. In product feedback this means you get a lot of hypothetical behavior – people tell you they’ll upgrade if you add that one more thing, or they’d adopt it when their team size is big enough. There’s a massive temptation to treat this on equal footing with people who have actually upgraded or adopted your product, but it’s a mistake. In general small companies don’t know how they’ll behave as they grow, don’t know if they’d buy something until they see the price, and don’t know if they’d use something until they actually have the need.

Reducing rate of incoming issues. Everyone loves the latest, shiny new project. But if the same issues are coming up time and time again, you’re letting your customers and your support team down. Even by talking to say, three customers, you’re very likely to encounter many of the most significant problems relating to a specific workflow.

Positive and (negative feedback). Your work might look great when it’s beautifully mapped out on a whiteboard but it’s only when it’s in the hands of real worlds users that the rubber hits the road. The faster you get the feedback on what you’ve shipped, the faster you’ll learn. Think of it as positive reinforcement.

Identifying non-product feature requests. By identifying an engineering problem with a customer and bringing it back to the team, and explaining the support impact this work would have, it lets us re-organizse our roadmap. We can then prioritise this task as something that will improve the quality of the product.

Just enough communication

People always like to predict their behavior, even in circumstances they’ve never experienced. In product feedback this means you get a lot of hypothetical behavior:

  1. People tell you they’ll upgrade if you add that one more thing, or they’d adopt it when their team size is big enough.
  2. There’s a massive temptation to treat this on equal footing with people who have actually upgraded or adopted your product, but it’s a mistake.
  3. In general small companies don’t know how they’ll behave as they grow, don’t know if they’d buy something until they see the price, and don’t know if they’d use something until they actually have the need.

People always like:

  • people tell you they’ll upgrade if you add;
  • there’s a massive temptation to treat this on equal footing with people who have actually;
  • in general small;
  • price.